Thursday, December 12, 2013

send your children to conferences

here is a revelation for anyone who has never been to a conference that's relevant to their profession: it's a great way to validate that you actually know what you're talking about. I mean, honestly, we mostly operate within the duck quack void of self-appreciation and we're only really interrogated and challenged when we're required to present, with authority, our opinion on what our interpretation of 'good' is in the narrow context of our own practice. but spending a day or two listening to people just like you, presenting their own ideas, propositions and theories, is a day or two where you quickly come to the realisation that you're not, in fact, the imposter you thought you might be. you're actually reasonably good. fuck it. you're very good.

a colleague of mine is out in san francisco this week, at a conference where there are some very clever, very smart people talking about design practice. I say they're very clever and very smart, but really, I've no idea. at least I've heard of them. they've mostly written a book about something or other that's relevant. but, you know, I've never worked with them, so I can't personally say whether they're any good at what they do. but they tell a good story. and that's what we've got to go on. and this colleague reflected on her first day at the conference with a telling phrase: I am getting the feeling we actually are doing stuff so right! and she means that as a company and as the individuals that make that company what it is. and I'm not surprised. because that's the feeling I get when I attend similar events.

when you find yourself in a safe environment, and there's not much safer than conferences, especially those with a significant proportion of first-time speakers, then that's when you give yourself permission to evaluate your own position. my first speaking engagement was at the IA summit. I'd never done any public speaking before, least of all about my own practice. but that environment was as perfect a place as any to evaluate, compare, contrast and make your own conclusions about how you're placed on the weird global/parochial peer spectrum. and really, it's not a question of relativity. it's much more about reassurance and a sense of acknowledgement.

which is all a rather roundabout way of saying that there is much to be gained from attending a conference of like-minded individuals to understand your own position within that community. I advocate conference attendance as a learning experience. bluntly put, I recommend conference attendance as the place where training budget is invested, because I believe that proactive conference attendance adds value as a career development opportunity by a factor of at least ten over traditional training or courseware. it's definitely where I spend all my training budget. and if that runs out, especially where the IA summit is concerned, I'll pay for it myself. it's a no-brainer.

Monday, December 9, 2013

commercially viable interaction design mastery

as this train slips by the half lit empty warehouses on the edge of town, imagination rustles the carrier bag of existence. I had a vivid dream last night about travelling on a train that gets cut lengthways from front to back as I'm travelling on it. just as I was about to extract meaning from that dream, my alarm sounded, like the distant call of a train, because I had to get up to get a train. the recursion of circumstance contained in those few seconds demanded that I extract some kind of metaphor from it, but try as I might, there really wasn't one. maybe something about a train of thought (stabs self with pencil of despair).

I met with a very bright person today who is very interested in pursuing a career in interaction design. so keen that he is pursuing a masters degree in interaction design. and while he is doing that masters degree, he would rather like to get commercial experience in practicing interaction design. upon discussing which, I suggested it would be very good if this could somehow enable us to better inform the curriculum for a masters degree for interaction design such that it enables graduates to be commercially relevant and employable because christ knows commercial design companies are forever moaning about academic design curriculums not being commercially focused enough and the irony of the recursion of him needing commercial experience to be commercially viable while suggesting we can somehow use his experience to inform the structure of a commercially focused interaction design course is not lost on me although most of that sentence possibly was.

I bought a paramore album yesterday. I can't explain that at all.

Friday, December 6, 2013

patterns

on the discovery and deliberation of patterns it is a better thing we do to deny our learning and reference the landscape that we surface for whereupon some fresh faces are removed from their host and commune upon the meaning and principle of the very elements that evoke the things which we're bound to call engagement emotion experience and delight then our challenge must be to question the very semantics of our endeavour for when we distribute this cognitive load and balance expectations most notably on the axis of strategic and attainable then there will be a mountain of prejudice and presumption that once manifest and articulated may only result in an irresistible deference to an equilibrium that defines the problem for as much as we coalesce around the principles and we refine refine reiterate and replay we ultimately provide our own context and that is where we imagine those patterns as extensions of the understanding we currently have rather than an understanding of what can be we may at times realise such distances from our everyday that we are able to explore without constraint and within that we can begin to discover those patterns that behaviourally would seem to get us closer to some kind of new resolution then within those arbitrary boundaries we're going to realise our own conditions and parameters and they will determine the measure of success against which our interactions and behaviours can be evaluated making the estimation in those terms enables those participants and practitioners to filter around a common axis with a predictable set of data without this earthing there can be no parity and without this parity we're divergent at best and tangental at least if we can begin to recognise what common language enables us to articulate then the patterns begin to emerge

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

on specificity

when we were trying to find a suit for my dad when my sister got married, there wasn't much of a plan. I mean, there wasn't a particular style or look we were going for. we didn't really have a great understanding of what might be the right thing, other than it should probably be a bit, like, summery. but beyond that, we were at a bit of a loss. so we thought we should consult the expert in these matters. a tailor.

having explained to the best of our ability exactly how we thought my dad's suit should manifest, having stumbled over at least half an oxford english dictionary and a couple of rogets, we alighted on a deafening silence, accompanied by an awkward gawping stare, waiting, almost reverently, for said tailor to deliver a verdict. and when he spake it felt as like it were the very voice of heaven cascading over our heavy shoulders. and he did spake unto us thus: "you need something a little..." yes? "...a little..." go on? "well..."

"unstructured"

...

"let me show you"

actually, it was the perfect description of what was required. I can't really describe to you how the suit looked, but I think you can get an idea from that single word. but it isn't the word that made the difference. it was the acknowledgement that specificity in of itself wasn't the thing that was providing any clarity. it was using the right language based on the context that made the difference. and he just made that word up. but it was exactly the right word at the right time, based on the information he had.

I am the least academic person I know. I'm a terrible intellectual and appallingly unintelligent. do I know tufte? no I don't know tufte. have I been getting away with it as a user experience designer for ten years? maybe. but you can't personally say that unless you've worked with me and I've disabled comments for anybody who has worked with me.

I've done good things though. I have apparently made clients happy. I haven't changed the world. I haven't set out to. but to the best of my abilities I design for the user based on the evidence I have. much like the tailor. I really don't know whether I'm using a taxonomy, an information architecture, a flow diagram, a blueprint, a journey map, a haynes manual, a cognitive disentropy matrix or whatever. I could really not care what those things are and the limits or constraints of what they're supposed to communicate.

but I'm good at finding the word. and if I can sit in a room, with a pen and something to use it on, then I can probably show you what I mean. and that's about as specific as it gets.